By Maura Montez :: Photography by Jamison Mosley

 

E

dible flowers are a wonderful way to add flavor and beauty to almost any dish. Make certain flowers are grown organically and pesticide-free. Not all flowers are edible, so be sure to accurately identify the flower and its edible parts before adding to dishes. Use sparingly when cooking, as the flavors can quickly become overpowering.

 

 

You can find a list of more than 80 edible flowers at What’s Cooking America.

 


 

 

Rose

All types of roses are edible, but the best judge as to how they taste is how they smell. The sweeter the smell, the sweeter the taste. Rose petals can be brewed into tea, turned into tinctures, baked into pastries, candied with egg whites and sugar, or used as a beautiful, edible salad garnish.

 

 

 

Eryngium

In raw form, as seen here, Eryngium can be used as an artful and unique garnish. When cooked, it takes on a chestnut flavor. The shoots can be candied or boiled and chopped for use in salads. This is a great ornamental plant that is said to have aphrodisiac qualities.

 

 

 

 

Carnation

Carnations tend to have a peppery flavor. Separate the petals to use in a salad, candy them for desserts, or steep them in wine and cordials to pack an added “punch”.

 

 

 

Goldenrod

Almost every part of this plant can be consumed. It can be used in soup, salads and teas. Its distinct spicy flavor complements vegetables such as radishes, broccoli and asparagus.

 


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